September is Recovery Month! http://www.recoverymonth.gov/ -check it out!

This time, I am going to post something that may generate some controversial conversation. I honestly have a curiosity about this topic so please feel free to jump in and discuss in the comments section. Forgive me if I offend anyone. Thanks for reading!

Celebrating recovery is an integral component in a person’s efforts to obtain and maintain sobriety. It’s important to recognize the accomplishments and milestones that people reach in their recovery journey and to take steps to praise and congratulate them for their hard work. For some, just getting through one day at a time without our substance of use or behavior is what gets us to our 30 day, 60 day, 90 day, and all the way up to the year(s) milestone. Even if focusing on not using that one day at a time is all that a person does in an effort to remain sober, it’s a huge cause for celebration! …right? That is the end goal after all, don’t drink, use, engage etc… the only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking –says the AA literature… But when does it become necessary to begin working on one’s self? When does it become more about growth and change in personality and characteristics and less about how much time we have? It doesn’t just happen as we get more time under our belt, at least not for most. After all, we’ve all heard of or have first-hand experience with what’s referred to as a “Dry Drunk” and the negative behaviors that persist even after a person abstains. How can we recognize the importance of abstaining and remaining sober, if the negative behaviors are still present?

“Hey, you’re still a jerk and treat others poorly, but good job getting to 90 days!”

Is that right? I mean… where do we draw the line? When does the celebration of time sober switch to celebration of personal growth and internal changes that help us achieve “the good life” we claim to be seeking? I want to hear what you have to say!

2 comments on “Celebrating recovery

  • Bev says:

    Well, we all had to change slightly in order to enter into the program. Maybe one becomes complacent sitting around tables and talking–perfecting their “look good” to the point where others believe with their ears…but you are talking about those who remain so obnoxious that others wish they would go back to drinking, right? They usually do not last long in sobriety because sobriety actually requires small shifts (like the initial push to seek help and “admit” to problem). Many times they cannot make those social connections which are the web which becomes the support network of the sober person.

    It is not up to us to draw a line, it is only up to us to support–if you cannot support someone’s behavior, and you “ignore” it–they will most likely go away. So in a way the line is naturally drawn, as they are weeded out of the social web.

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  • Trevor says:

    No SERIOUSLY he is not my boiyefrnd. MY boiyefrnd has issues with his family but no drug or alcohol abuse problems that I can ascertain. I wouldn’t hook up with someone that drank that amount of alcohol each day. I can’t see the point of it.

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